UK Dividends - FAQ




What dividends do you show?

Upcoming dividend information will be shown for ordinary share dividends for companies listed on the London Stock Exchange (LSE). These dividends will be grouped into the following categories:

FTSE 100 - The largest 100 companies listed on the London Stock Exchange.

FTSE 250 - The largest 250 companies listed on the London Stock Exchange that are outside of the FTSE 100.

FTSE SmallCap - Companies that are within the FTSE All-Share index but are outside of the FTSE 100 and FTSE 250.

FTSE Fledgling - Companies that are too small to be included in the FTSE All-Share index.

Main Market - Companies listed on the Main Market of the London Stock Exchange but are not part of any FTSE index.

AIM - A sub market of the London Stock Exchange with less stringent rules than the Main Market.


Upcoming dividends from companies in the above categories will be shown on this site if the company provides the following information:

  • The company declares a dividend amount.
  • The company declares an ex-dividend date for the dividend.
  • The company declares a payment date for the dividend.

If the above criteria are met the dividend will appear on the ex dividend date and dividend payment date pages.



Where do you get your dividend data from?

All dividend data shown on this site has been manually extracted from the official company RNS announcements. No automated feeds are used. All data is manually checked before it is uploaded on to this site.


How often is the site updated?

This site is updated several times a week. Dividend information for a company will appear on this site about 24 hours after the dividend is declared.


What dividend yield information do you show?

The dividend yield pages show the annual dividend yields for FTSE 100 and FTSE 250 companies. Full details of yield calculations are provided on each individual company dividend yield page. These pages also show historic dividend yields.


What dividend history information do you show?

The dividend history pages show historic dividend data for FTSE 100 and FTSE 250 companies. The following historic dividend information is shown for these companies:

  • Individual and total annual dividends.
  • Special dividends and return of capital payments.
  • Annual dividend growth rates.
  • Compound annual growth rates - 5, 10, and 15 year CAGR.

How far back does the dividend history data go?

Dividend history data is available for FTSE 350 companies from the year 2000.


Are historic dividends adjusted for past corporate actions?

Yes. All historic dividends have been adjusted for corporate actions such as:

  • Rights issues.
  • Bonus share issues.
  • Share consolidations.
  • Share splits.

Full details of all adjustments made is provided on each individual company dividend history page. Unadjusted dividend data is also provided.


How often do companies pay dividends?

The majority of dividend paying companies listed on the London Stock Exchange (LSE) pay dividends two times per year. Some companies pay a dividend every month, some four times a year, and some once a year. The table below shows a breakdown of the dividend frequency for companies in the FTSE 100 and FTSE 250.

Dividend Frequency FTSE 100 FTSE 250
Every Month0 companies1 company
4 times per year11 companies17 companies
2 times per year81 companies180 companies
Once per year4 companies19 companies
No dividends5 companies33 companies

To check the dividend frequency of a specific company check the dividend yield pages.


What is a dividend?

A dividend is a payment made by a company to individuals who own shares in the company. The details of the dividend, such as the dividend amount and payment date, are usually outlined when a company releases it financial results. Dividends are usually declared as an amount per share.

Example: A company may declare a dividend payment of 4.2p per share. Therefore, if you owned 600 shares in that company you will would receive a dividend payment of 600 * £0.042 = £25.20.


What is the Ex-Dividend Date?

In order to qualify for a dividend payment you must own shares in the company before the market opens on the ex-dividend date. Any shares bought on or after the ex-dividend date will not qualify for the dividend.

Example: Company declares a dividend payment of 5p per share. It declares an ex-dividend date of 14th March, a record date of 16th March, and a dividend payment date of 10 April.

Scenario 1: You buy 1000 shares on 13th March, and sell the 1000 shares on 14th March. You will receive a dividend payment of (1000 * £0.05) = £50 on 10th April.

Scenario 2: You own 0 shares on 13th March, and buy 1000 shares on 14th March. You will not receive any dividend payment on the 10th April.

Scenario 3: You buy 2000 share on the 10th March, and you sell 500 of these of the 15th March. You will receive a dividend payment of (2000 * £0.05) = £100 on 10th April.

To see all upcoming ex-dividend dates check the ex dividend date pages.


What is the Record Date?

The dividend record date is an administrative date and it is usually a single business day after the ex-dividend date. The record date is the date a company will check its shareholder list to see who owns shares in the company. Your name must be on this list on the record date in order to receive the declared dividend. In order to make sure your name is on the company's shareholder list on the record date, you must own shares in the company before the ex-dividend date. This is because when you purchase shares in a company it usually takes two business days for your name to appear on the company's shareholder list. This process is known as T+2 settlement.

Note: Before October 2014 the dividend settlement process was a T+3 settlement. This meant that the dividend record date was two business days after the ex-dividend date.


What is Dividend Yield?

Dividend yield is simply the dividend amount divided by the current share price (and is usually expressed as a percentage).

Example: Company declares a dividend payment of 6p per share. If the company's current share price is 124p, the dividend yield is 6/124 = 0.04838. As a percentage the dividend yield would be 4.84%.